Presentation Title

Screencasting for Student Collaboration

Submission Type

75-minute Hands-on Workshop

Abstract

This presentation will provide the attendees with a new perspective on utilizing screencasting technology and Google applications, within project based learning, for improving student learning, assessment, and collaboration within hybrid courses. The workshop facilitators will model how they are using student-created screencasts, integrated within Google applications, as a strategy for engaging learners with clear learning goals for assessment. Attendees will be guided through the process of creating screencasts, developing collaborative assignments and group assessments for use in their own teaching.

Start Date

5-23-2018 3:00 PM

Description

While lecture capture technologies have been adopted by a number of faculty to allow for creation of instructor-led instruction (Germany, 2012), some practitioners see value in putting such technologies in the hands of students instead. Berardi and Blundell (2014) suggest that using constructivist theories as a basis for design lends itself to allowing students to create their own video course materials, presentations, and knowledge bases. In practice, student produced video has been shown to provide ways to engage students in a variety of disciplines, including computer science to show student grasp of programming and networking concepts (Tabor and Minch, 2013; Chewar and Matthews, 2015); nursing to demonstrate application of techniques (Sorenson and Dieter, 2005); and foreign language to practice application to cultural situations (Meyer and Forester, 2015).

There are several reasons that using screencasting in collaborative groups may be preferable for students. Tabor and Minch (2013) suggest that groups can help one another manage the higher time commitment of video production. A small pilot study of graduate medical students by Marinov, Webb, and Valter (2016) reported benefits to students through deeper understanding of content.

Based upon the literature it appears that student generation of screencasts holds potential value as a method for assessing students’ learning outcomes in a variety of courses. The purpose of this session is to explore with participants how this approach might be implemented in their teaching.

Goals and Objectives for the Practice Session

This session will facilitate learning of the following objectives:

1) Gain knowledge of the principles that under-gird the use of screencasts in educational settings, focusing on the power of allowing students to express their learning through generation of collaborative screencasts.

2) Broaden their perspective of how to use screencasts to promote student-centered environments and foster collaborative learning in hybrid and blended course modalities.

3) Gain exposure to various tools and resources for incorporating collaborative student-created screencasts into their own courses.

4) Begin consideration of how they might craft assignments that utilize collaborative student-created screencasts to meet learning objectives.

5) Begin to consider how they might create assessments for collaborative student-created screencasts that align with their course objectives.

Discussion

This session allows the participant to consider the potential for collaborative student-created screencasting to enhance the teaching and learning environment in college courses. By employing a thoughtful approach to the design of assignments, including how to assess screencasts, a participant can takeaway from the session the beginnings of a learning assignment for use in their own courses.

References

Berardi, V., Blundell, G. E. (2014). A Learning Theory Conceptual Foundation for Using Capture Technology in Teaching. Information Systems Education Journal, 12(2) pp 64-73.

Chewar, C., & Matthews, S.J. (2016)."Lights, Camera Action! Video Deliverables for Programming Projects". Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges, 31(3), 8-17.

Germany, L. (2012). Beyond lecture capture: What teaching staff want from web-based lecture technologies. Australasian Journal Of Educational Technology, 28(7), 1208-1220.

Meyer, E., & Forester, L. (2015). Implementing Student-Produced Video Projects in Language Courses: Guidelines and Lessons Learned. Die Unterrichtspraxis / Teaching German, 48(2), 192-210.

Marinov, V., Webb, A. L. and Valter, K. (2016), Teaching is the best way to learn: student-led screencasting. Med Educ, 50: 1155–1156. doi:10.1111/medu.13169

Sorenson, D. S., & Dieter, C. (2005). From Beginning to End: Video-based Introductory, Instructional, and Evaluation Applications. Nurse Educator, 30(1), 40-43.

Tabor, S., Minch, R. (2013). Student Adoption & Development of Digital Learning Media: Action Research & Recommended Practices. Journal of Information Technology Education, 12(June), 203-223.

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May 23rd, 3:00 PM

Screencasting for Student Collaboration

This presentation will provide the attendees with a new perspective on utilizing screencasting technology and Google applications, within project based learning, for improving student learning, assessment, and collaboration within hybrid courses. The workshop facilitators will model how they are using student-created screencasts, integrated within Google applications, as a strategy for engaging learners with clear learning goals for assessment. Attendees will be guided through the process of creating screencasts, developing collaborative assignments and group assessments for use in their own teaching.