Title

Annotating the Classics: A platform for multimedia annotation of classical texts

Streaming Media

Submission Type

Panel Discussion

Abstract

East Asian Humanities I: The Classical Foundations is an introduction to the literature, art, and philosophy of China, Japan, and Korea from antiquity to ca. 1400 and aims to allow students to explore the unique aspects of East Asian civilization and the connections between them within an online platform. Faculty from the East Asian Studies department wishing to breathe new life into a very long-standing and familiar survey course decided to revise their pedagogical approach and enhance student’s engagement through the incorporation of an interactive online platform. Faculty members, in collaboration with staff from the Educational and Classroom Technologies (ECT) group (a division of the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning), planned and developed the platform that not only presents the course materials, but also allows students to augment those materials with multimedia annotations. A Wordpress plugin developed by the ECT group allows students to link multimedia projects, articles and assignments to classical texts in East Asian Studies, transforming each text into a new reading experience.

Three types of assignments were originally developed for this course:

  1. Multimedia Annotations: Students annotate original texts with images, videos, audio and commentary, producing a new ways to experience the text.

  2. Articles/Responses: Students write short responses their peer’s work or their reactions to course readings.

  3. Projects: Groups are formed to focus on a particular area of interest. The group utilizes multiple texts and various forms of media in order to elucidate key themes of the course. Students have also incorporated interactive timelines, image galleries, and interactive maps to articulate their points.

This ongoing project, entering its fourth year, represents for us a useful blended learning environment. The project brings classroom materials into the digital realm and takes advantage of the multimedia capabilities of online environments. The platform encourages students to construct their understanding of classical texts, both individually and collaboratively, and to create a representation that is uniquely their own.

Sorat Tungkasiri and Ben Johnston will talk about this and other annotation projects they are engaged in at Princeton University as well as the pedagogical goals for digital platforms such as these in coursework at Princeton.

Session

Presentation

Location

Thomas 104

Start Date

5-18-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

5-18-2017 10:20 AM

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May 18th, 9:00 AM May 18th, 10:20 AM

Annotating the Classics: A platform for multimedia annotation of classical texts

Thomas 104

East Asian Humanities I: The Classical Foundations is an introduction to the literature, art, and philosophy of China, Japan, and Korea from antiquity to ca. 1400 and aims to allow students to explore the unique aspects of East Asian civilization and the connections between them within an online platform. Faculty from the East Asian Studies department wishing to breathe new life into a very long-standing and familiar survey course decided to revise their pedagogical approach and enhance student’s engagement through the incorporation of an interactive online platform. Faculty members, in collaboration with staff from the Educational and Classroom Technologies (ECT) group (a division of the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning), planned and developed the platform that not only presents the course materials, but also allows students to augment those materials with multimedia annotations. A Wordpress plugin developed by the ECT group allows students to link multimedia projects, articles and assignments to classical texts in East Asian Studies, transforming each text into a new reading experience.

Three types of assignments were originally developed for this course:

  1. Multimedia Annotations: Students annotate original texts with images, videos, audio and commentary, producing a new ways to experience the text.

  2. Articles/Responses: Students write short responses their peer’s work or their reactions to course readings.

  3. Projects: Groups are formed to focus on a particular area of interest. The group utilizes multiple texts and various forms of media in order to elucidate key themes of the course. Students have also incorporated interactive timelines, image galleries, and interactive maps to articulate their points.

This ongoing project, entering its fourth year, represents for us a useful blended learning environment. The project brings classroom materials into the digital realm and takes advantage of the multimedia capabilities of online environments. The platform encourages students to construct their understanding of classical texts, both individually and collaboratively, and to create a representation that is uniquely their own.

Sorat Tungkasiri and Ben Johnston will talk about this and other annotation projects they are engaged in at Princeton University as well as the pedagogical goals for digital platforms such as these in coursework at Princeton.