Title

E-portfolio: Powerful Tool for Assessment, Reflection, and Critical Thinking

Presenter Information

Barbara H. YalofFollow

Streaming Media

Submission Type

20-minute Presentation

Abstract

In this presentation I discuss what an e-portfolio is and how it can best used to showcase student learning, while at the same time, serve a larger and more meaningful purpose for the student. What does it mean to the student to assemble their best work? How can reflection be used to inspire critical thinking as students choose and explain their selections? E-portfolios are web-based collections of multi-media assets and incorporate creative entries that illustrate student skill and progress. E-Portfolios may include items such as blog entries, multi-media presentations, scholarly papers, and reflection papers and presentations. The e-portfolio assembly process allows students to correct errors not noticed on initial submission of the artifacts. Furthermore the portfolio requirements force students to evaluate their work through a process of critical thinking, which capitalizes on the students’ ability for self-reflection. Students at American College of Education (ACE) go through a rigorous process of determining which artifacts they chose to upload to align with the 7 overall program outcomes. Additional assignments created for the e-portfolio reviewer illustrate the students’ self-reflection, critical thinking, and ability to explain their specific choices of artifacts from among the hundreds of assignments created during their educational journey. In many of those reflection and rationale papers, students describe the value of “second-looks” when reviewing their work. Portfolio reviewers (final assessment) utilize specialized rubrics when providing feedback on fulfilment of program outcomes. Some of this work becomes uploaded to public sites, which supports student motivation, Similarly, the completed online portfolio can be viewed by ACE faculty and ultimately, potential field site placement personnel or employers. Examples of student-selected artifacts are presented and discussed.

Session

Presentation

Location

Thomas 110

Start Date

5-18-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

5-18-2017 10:20 AM

 
May 18th, 9:00 AM May 18th, 10:20 AM

E-portfolio: Powerful Tool for Assessment, Reflection, and Critical Thinking

Thomas 110

In this presentation I discuss what an e-portfolio is and how it can best used to showcase student learning, while at the same time, serve a larger and more meaningful purpose for the student. What does it mean to the student to assemble their best work? How can reflection be used to inspire critical thinking as students choose and explain their selections? E-portfolios are web-based collections of multi-media assets and incorporate creative entries that illustrate student skill and progress. E-Portfolios may include items such as blog entries, multi-media presentations, scholarly papers, and reflection papers and presentations. The e-portfolio assembly process allows students to correct errors not noticed on initial submission of the artifacts. Furthermore the portfolio requirements force students to evaluate their work through a process of critical thinking, which capitalizes on the students’ ability for self-reflection. Students at American College of Education (ACE) go through a rigorous process of determining which artifacts they chose to upload to align with the 7 overall program outcomes. Additional assignments created for the e-portfolio reviewer illustrate the students’ self-reflection, critical thinking, and ability to explain their specific choices of artifacts from among the hundreds of assignments created during their educational journey. In many of those reflection and rationale papers, students describe the value of “second-looks” when reviewing their work. Portfolio reviewers (final assessment) utilize specialized rubrics when providing feedback on fulfilment of program outcomes. Some of this work becomes uploaded to public sites, which supports student motivation, Similarly, the completed online portfolio can be viewed by ACE faculty and ultimately, potential field site placement personnel or employers. Examples of student-selected artifacts are presented and discussed.