Title

Critical Making and Experiential Learning with 3D Printing

Streaming Media

Submission Type

20-minute Presentation

Abstract

A rusty axe head, a bust of Stalin, and a florescent pink shark: the makerspace is cluttered with evidence of the experimental projects that drive playful discovery and learning. These 3D-printed artifacts range from the ridiculous to the culturally significant and help faculty connect with and teach students across disciplines in new, creative ways. Yet, while 3D printing continues to rank among the most significant and quickly maturing technologies in the professional world, perceived logistical challenges and inexperience with the technology continue to limit its effective implementation in the classroom, especially in the humanities. This presentation addresses the advantages of 3D printed objects and 3D printing activities within well-established theories of teaching and learning, including critical making and experiential learning. Contextualizing 3D printing assignments within these frameworks, this paper introduces example assignments from language, archaeology, and biology courses and considers how this technology can complement existing course objectives, introduce problem-solving workflows, and expose students to the modes of preservation, engagement, and collaboration emerging in science and humanities fields today. Moreover, it addresses some of the recent technological advances that make 3D printing more accessible in terms of cost, skill, and time needed to successfully print both traditional and specialized materials. The presentation concludes with tips and questions instructors should consider when incorporating 3D printing into their own courses for the first time, addressing the necessary negotiation of institutional resources, student skill-development, and learning objectives unique to their own courses.

Session

Presentation

Location

Thomas 224

Start Date

5-18-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

5-18-2017 10:20 AM

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May 18th, 9:00 AM May 18th, 10:20 AM

Critical Making and Experiential Learning with 3D Printing

Thomas 224

A rusty axe head, a bust of Stalin, and a florescent pink shark: the makerspace is cluttered with evidence of the experimental projects that drive playful discovery and learning. These 3D-printed artifacts range from the ridiculous to the culturally significant and help faculty connect with and teach students across disciplines in new, creative ways. Yet, while 3D printing continues to rank among the most significant and quickly maturing technologies in the professional world, perceived logistical challenges and inexperience with the technology continue to limit its effective implementation in the classroom, especially in the humanities. This presentation addresses the advantages of 3D printed objects and 3D printing activities within well-established theories of teaching and learning, including critical making and experiential learning. Contextualizing 3D printing assignments within these frameworks, this paper introduces example assignments from language, archaeology, and biology courses and considers how this technology can complement existing course objectives, introduce problem-solving workflows, and expose students to the modes of preservation, engagement, and collaboration emerging in science and humanities fields today. Moreover, it addresses some of the recent technological advances that make 3D printing more accessible in terms of cost, skill, and time needed to successfully print both traditional and specialized materials. The presentation concludes with tips and questions instructors should consider when incorporating 3D printing into their own courses for the first time, addressing the necessary negotiation of institutional resources, student skill-development, and learning objectives unique to their own courses.