Title

Community Service with Web-Based Geographic Information Science and Technology (GIST): Blended Pedagogies for the Twenty-First Century

Submission Type

20-minute Presentation

Abstract

This past year a team of technoacademics from the Five Colleges joined together to design, build, and implement a new course on Web-based geographic information science and technology (GIST). As is common with many GIS courses students formed small teams that worked on different projects. The projects were service-oriented, producing Web sites and interactive maps that benefited our institutions and other community organizations, and interdisciplinary, running the gamut from the geological to the conservational to the sociopolitical. Blended learning was a foundation of the course, with most materials provided online, and before class students were expected to review it, work exercises, and answer quiz questions. Once in class they actively applied what they learned to real data sets relevant to their projects, where their efforts were not so clear-cut and needed more hands-on support. As a result the course on most days was “flipped” or “workshopped”. The course also had an explicit focus on open learning, relying on open-source technology, open data sets, and openly licensed content written by ourselves or others.

Session

Mapping & Digital Projects, Presentation

Start Date

5-18-2016 2:00 PM

End Date

5-18-2016 3:15 PM

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May 18th, 2:00 PM May 18th, 3:15 PM

Community Service with Web-Based Geographic Information Science and Technology (GIST): Blended Pedagogies for the Twenty-First Century

This past year a team of technoacademics from the Five Colleges joined together to design, build, and implement a new course on Web-based geographic information science and technology (GIST). As is common with many GIS courses students formed small teams that worked on different projects. The projects were service-oriented, producing Web sites and interactive maps that benefited our institutions and other community organizations, and interdisciplinary, running the gamut from the geological to the conservational to the sociopolitical. Blended learning was a foundation of the course, with most materials provided online, and before class students were expected to review it, work exercises, and answer quiz questions. Once in class they actively applied what they learned to real data sets relevant to their projects, where their efforts were not so clear-cut and needed more hands-on support. As a result the course on most days was “flipped” or “workshopped”. The course also had an explicit focus on open learning, relying on open-source technology, open data sets, and openly licensed content written by ourselves or others.