Title

Disruptive Innovation: Exploring Blended Learning in Graduate Student Training

Submission Type

Poster

Abstract

This poster session will explore the concept of Disruptive Innovation in the context of a small, public, Liberal Arts and Sciences University in central Massachusetts. Worcester State University is exploring blended learning opportunities for Graduate Students in the NASP (National Association of School Psychology) approved School Psychology program. The WSU Strategic plan indicates that as a public university grounded in the liberal arts tradition, “The University will be preparing well-rounded, culturally conscious critical thinkers and problem solvers” through “innovative, integrative academic programming that supports and advances a model of transformative change in students.” The specific strategies related to this initiative include both: a) Build the infrastructure to support growth in graduate offerings and enrollment and b) Expand high-quality online and hybrid classes and develop new online programs. This new curricular initiative will align with both of these strategies.

In addition to seeking transformative change for all students, our academic community is always exploring opportunities that will meet the needs of students who are historically underrepresented. Part of the WSU mission is to “attract and enroll a diverse pool of highly motivated students and prioritize their retention and success.” One of the ways the University is seeking to meet the needs of diverse candidates, including those from urban settings and those who may need financial aid, is to “Implement a sustainable approach to online programming that meets market demands and is attractive to students and supported by faculty.” It is with this context in mind that the Graduate Program in School Psychology is exploring the possibility of transforming a number of traditional brick and mortar courses into blended courses (Ginns & Ellis, 2007). This poster will explore this curricular redevelopment process from a program, planning and evaluation lens and will examine the development, implementation, efficacy and sustainability of the new model (Garrison & Kanuta, 2004).

Relatedly, this poster will also explore the process of Disruptive Innovation as it relates to this complex educational system and the introduction of new, innovative teaching methods. Disruptive Innovation is a term coined in 1995 by Dr. Clayton Christensen, Professor at Harvard Business School (Christensen, & Eyring, 2011). The theory postulates that a new product or service (the disruptive innovation) is an innovation that creates a new market and value, eventually disrupting the existing market. A large component of the model relates to the discovery of new markets, new customers and/or new ways of meeting the current customers needs. When considering education through the lens of service delivery, students become customers and educational organizations are constantly asking “How do we better meet your needs?” Christensen notes “an innovation that is disruptive allows a whole new population of consumers at the bottom of a market access to a product of service that was historically only accessible to consumers with a lot of money or a lot of skill” (Christensen, Horn & Johnson, 2008). This poster will explore how the use of blended learning models may echo the concept of Disruptive Innovation in an educational setting.

Session

Poster Session

Start Date

5-19-2016 3:00 PM

End Date

5-19-2016 4:00 PM

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May 19th, 3:00 PM May 19th, 4:00 PM

Disruptive Innovation: Exploring Blended Learning in Graduate Student Training

This poster session will explore the concept of Disruptive Innovation in the context of a small, public, Liberal Arts and Sciences University in central Massachusetts. Worcester State University is exploring blended learning opportunities for Graduate Students in the NASP (National Association of School Psychology) approved School Psychology program. The WSU Strategic plan indicates that as a public university grounded in the liberal arts tradition, “The University will be preparing well-rounded, culturally conscious critical thinkers and problem solvers” through “innovative, integrative academic programming that supports and advances a model of transformative change in students.” The specific strategies related to this initiative include both: a) Build the infrastructure to support growth in graduate offerings and enrollment and b) Expand high-quality online and hybrid classes and develop new online programs. This new curricular initiative will align with both of these strategies.

In addition to seeking transformative change for all students, our academic community is always exploring opportunities that will meet the needs of students who are historically underrepresented. Part of the WSU mission is to “attract and enroll a diverse pool of highly motivated students and prioritize their retention and success.” One of the ways the University is seeking to meet the needs of diverse candidates, including those from urban settings and those who may need financial aid, is to “Implement a sustainable approach to online programming that meets market demands and is attractive to students and supported by faculty.” It is with this context in mind that the Graduate Program in School Psychology is exploring the possibility of transforming a number of traditional brick and mortar courses into blended courses (Ginns & Ellis, 2007). This poster will explore this curricular redevelopment process from a program, planning and evaluation lens and will examine the development, implementation, efficacy and sustainability of the new model (Garrison & Kanuta, 2004).

Relatedly, this poster will also explore the process of Disruptive Innovation as it relates to this complex educational system and the introduction of new, innovative teaching methods. Disruptive Innovation is a term coined in 1995 by Dr. Clayton Christensen, Professor at Harvard Business School (Christensen, & Eyring, 2011). The theory postulates that a new product or service (the disruptive innovation) is an innovation that creates a new market and value, eventually disrupting the existing market. A large component of the model relates to the discovery of new markets, new customers and/or new ways of meeting the current customers needs. When considering education through the lens of service delivery, students become customers and educational organizations are constantly asking “How do we better meet your needs?” Christensen notes “an innovation that is disruptive allows a whole new population of consumers at the bottom of a market access to a product of service that was historically only accessible to consumers with a lot of money or a lot of skill” (Christensen, Horn & Johnson, 2008). This poster will explore how the use of blended learning models may echo the concept of Disruptive Innovation in an educational setting.