Title

Closing the Book: The Shift from Print to Digital and Its Impact on Urban Learners

Streaming Media

Submission Type

20-minute Presentation

Abstract

Students demographically described as “urban learners” are often at a disadvantage when using digital learning tools. Lacking the technology, budgets and IT staff of larger universities, many smaller schools, which have taken on the task of educating this underserved population, often have serious challenges implementing the technological advances that make digital or blended learning so attractive. At my own institution, Trinity Washington University, a small liberal arts college in Washington, DC, such an issue exists.

However, can using simple digital strategies improve learning outcomes for urban learners? My experience substituting digital materials for traditional textbooks has proven that even taking baby steps into technology can have a significant impact on student success in art history survey. Originally, I began experimenting with digital materials to reduce the cost of textbooks, but it has also proven to be significant factor in engaging students and helping them to achieve better grades. A blend of old and new can achieve real results in the art history classroom.

Based on my own data collection and teaching experience, my presentation will explore “blending” a classroom with limited technological resources, successfully substituting digital materials for traditional print products. In my experience, many conference presentations in the arts focus on using sophisticated and costly digital programs that are just not feasible in institutions with limited resources. The issue of using technology to help the urban learner is one deserving of more consideration, and the opportunity to present my observations would be a “baby step” in addressing this question.

Session

Access, Presentation

Start Date

5-19-2016 10:30 AM

End Date

5-19-2016 11:45 AM

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May 19th, 10:30 AM May 19th, 11:45 AM

Closing the Book: The Shift from Print to Digital and Its Impact on Urban Learners

Students demographically described as “urban learners” are often at a disadvantage when using digital learning tools. Lacking the technology, budgets and IT staff of larger universities, many smaller schools, which have taken on the task of educating this underserved population, often have serious challenges implementing the technological advances that make digital or blended learning so attractive. At my own institution, Trinity Washington University, a small liberal arts college in Washington, DC, such an issue exists.

However, can using simple digital strategies improve learning outcomes for urban learners? My experience substituting digital materials for traditional textbooks has proven that even taking baby steps into technology can have a significant impact on student success in art history survey. Originally, I began experimenting with digital materials to reduce the cost of textbooks, but it has also proven to be significant factor in engaging students and helping them to achieve better grades. A blend of old and new can achieve real results in the art history classroom.

Based on my own data collection and teaching experience, my presentation will explore “blending” a classroom with limited technological resources, successfully substituting digital materials for traditional print products. In my experience, many conference presentations in the arts focus on using sophisticated and costly digital programs that are just not feasible in institutions with limited resources. The issue of using technology to help the urban learner is one deserving of more consideration, and the opportunity to present my observations would be a “baby step” in addressing this question.