Title

Why Blend the Humanities?: A Critical Conversation

Streaming Media

Submission Type

Panel Discussion

Abstract

This roundtable consists of humanities faculty from a range of small colleges and universities, spanning from Massachusetts to New York, and Ohio to the Tri-College area. The panel’s familiarity with blended learning ranges from enthusiastic to skeptical. Each panelist will begin with brief remarks about his/her background in blending learning and also introduce a critical question for discussion that is informed by that background. For example, one panelist might ask: “Does blending the humanities compromise valued in-person relationships with students?” Another panelist might begin with the provocation: “How can blended learning and assessment practices pose unique challenges for humanists?” While each panelist will introduce one question for discussion, the goal of the panel is to facilitate a larger dynamic conversation about our various experiences (some wonderful, some yet still unknown) with blended learning. The roundtable panelists will engage the audience in leading a critical conversation on the practical, ideological, and pedagogical consequences of centering technology (including DH and blended learning practices) in the humanities classroom. It is our hope that we can continue this candid conversation on our individual campuses as each of us experiments with blended learning and also addresses some of our disciplinary reservations for doing so.

Session

Wrap-Up Roundtable Discussion

Start Date

5-19-2016 4:15 PM

End Date

5-19-2016 5:30 PM

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May 19th, 4:15 PM May 19th, 5:30 PM

Why Blend the Humanities?: A Critical Conversation

This roundtable consists of humanities faculty from a range of small colleges and universities, spanning from Massachusetts to New York, and Ohio to the Tri-College area. The panel’s familiarity with blended learning ranges from enthusiastic to skeptical. Each panelist will begin with brief remarks about his/her background in blending learning and also introduce a critical question for discussion that is informed by that background. For example, one panelist might ask: “Does blending the humanities compromise valued in-person relationships with students?” Another panelist might begin with the provocation: “How can blended learning and assessment practices pose unique challenges for humanists?” While each panelist will introduce one question for discussion, the goal of the panel is to facilitate a larger dynamic conversation about our various experiences (some wonderful, some yet still unknown) with blended learning. The roundtable panelists will engage the audience in leading a critical conversation on the practical, ideological, and pedagogical consequences of centering technology (including DH and blended learning practices) in the humanities classroom. It is our hope that we can continue this candid conversation on our individual campuses as each of us experiments with blended learning and also addresses some of our disciplinary reservations for doing so.