Title

Comparing Learning from Blended and Traditional Lectures Across Disciplines in a Small Liberal Arts University

Streaming Media

Abstract

There is a heated debate in the media effects and education literatures: Can the medium impact learning? This study attempts to add to this debate in an understudied context; a small, liberal arts university. The goal is to compare student learning outcomes, course evaluations, and faculty assessment of student engagement in blended and traditional versions of courses. The blended sections replaced 50% of in-class time with pre-recorded lectures and other related online activities, posted via Blackboard. The remaining class time was used for activities and discussion, not lecturing. Traditional courses met 100% of their allotted time face to face, and received the same amount and style of active learning activities. Using Communities of Inquiry as the theoretical framework, we hypothesized that student taking the blended section courses would perform better on course assessments. Preliminary findings and implications for utilizing blended course design in a liberal arts setting are discussed.

Session

Session 6B. But Does it Work? Research and Assessment of Blended Learning at Liberal Arts Colleges

Location

Dalton 119

Start Date

5-21-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

5-21-2015 11:45 AM

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May 21st, 10:30 AM May 21st, 11:45 AM

Comparing Learning from Blended and Traditional Lectures Across Disciplines in a Small Liberal Arts University

Dalton 119

There is a heated debate in the media effects and education literatures: Can the medium impact learning? This study attempts to add to this debate in an understudied context; a small, liberal arts university. The goal is to compare student learning outcomes, course evaluations, and faculty assessment of student engagement in blended and traditional versions of courses. The blended sections replaced 50% of in-class time with pre-recorded lectures and other related online activities, posted via Blackboard. The remaining class time was used for activities and discussion, not lecturing. Traditional courses met 100% of their allotted time face to face, and received the same amount and style of active learning activities. Using Communities of Inquiry as the theoretical framework, we hypothesized that student taking the blended section courses would perform better on course assessments. Preliminary findings and implications for utilizing blended course design in a liberal arts setting are discussed.