Abstract

The decision to incorporate or avoid blended approaches in our courses often hinges on our perceptions of instructional risk and the likelihood of successful outcomes for student learning. Absent first-hand experience, however, we cannot adequately discriminate the costs and benefits in relation to our individual circumstances. For these reasons, many faculty members never experiment with blended instruction or do so in relative isolation. In this session we describe a model for shared expertise and peer review that can effectively reduce barriers to pedagogical experimentation and instructional isolation, with the added benefit(s) of producing course assignments and/or learning objects within a semester’s period. The model integrates aspects of group-based learning, reflective practice, and peer accountability in a manner that transfers readily to blended instruction. We further provide an evaluation of faculty outcomes and reflections as participants in this process, as well as suggestions for staging productive peer -to- peer interactions. This session will be of particular value to faculty and to those who support pedagogical practice.

Session

Session 6A. Creating Institutional Support for Blended Learning and Tech-Enabled Teaching

Location

Dalton 300

Event Website

http://www.tu-collaborative.org/

Start Date

5-21-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

5-21-2015 11:45 AM

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May 21st, 10:30 AM May 21st, 11:45 AM

Moving from Theory to Practice in Blended Instruction

Dalton 300

The decision to incorporate or avoid blended approaches in our courses often hinges on our perceptions of instructional risk and the likelihood of successful outcomes for student learning. Absent first-hand experience, however, we cannot adequately discriminate the costs and benefits in relation to our individual circumstances. For these reasons, many faculty members never experiment with blended instruction or do so in relative isolation. In this session we describe a model for shared expertise and peer review that can effectively reduce barriers to pedagogical experimentation and instructional isolation, with the added benefit(s) of producing course assignments and/or learning objects within a semester’s period. The model integrates aspects of group-based learning, reflective practice, and peer accountability in a manner that transfers readily to blended instruction. We further provide an evaluation of faculty outcomes and reflections as participants in this process, as well as suggestions for staging productive peer -to- peer interactions. This session will be of particular value to faculty and to those who support pedagogical practice.

http://repository.brynmawr.edu/blended_learning/2015/2015/33