Streaming Media

Abstract

Our project is motivated by a desire to improve student learning of computer programming and algorithmic thinking. The approach is designed to not impact time-to-degree or faculty staffing demands. It purposely integrates skill building with content knowledge and emphasizes a culturally inclusive learning environment in an effort to improve the persistence and success of all students. The course is designed around a sequence of learning modules that use a combination of online and classroom instruction. The modules incorporate computational techniques in the context of scientific applications. They include exercises to provide practice in applying these techniques and assessments for students to demonstrate mastery. In a flipped approach, the modules are made available online to be read before class, and in class students work together to complete the exercises. Questions can be immediately addressed and peer learning and collaboration takes place naturally. Following the completion of the course, these modules will be embedded in core physics courses throughout the major sequence at introductory, intermediate and advanced levels. In this way students will progressively learn and practice essential computational skills without the Department having to staff a standalone course. In this presentation we will share what has worked in using self-study learning modules with embedded exercises and assessment; our experience of using web-based computational notebooks on a dedicated server; what we’ve tried and learned from attempting to create a culturally inclusive learning environment, for example our use of hybrid journals, student generated scientist profiles, and student consultants; and we will report on the experiences of students in the course. This effort is being funded by a grant from the Association of American Colleges & Universities TIDES project (Teaching to Increase Diversity and Equity in STEM).

Session

Session 3B: Blended Approaches to Teaching Computational Skills

Location

Dalton 119

Event Website

https://serendip.brynmawr.edu/oneworld/tides/explore

Start Date

5-20-2015 3:15 PM

End Date

5-20-2015 4:30 PM

Share

COinS
 
May 20th, 3:15 PM May 20th, 4:30 PM

Computational Skill-Building in the Natural Sciences using a Blended Approach

Dalton 119

Our project is motivated by a desire to improve student learning of computer programming and algorithmic thinking. The approach is designed to not impact time-to-degree or faculty staffing demands. It purposely integrates skill building with content knowledge and emphasizes a culturally inclusive learning environment in an effort to improve the persistence and success of all students. The course is designed around a sequence of learning modules that use a combination of online and classroom instruction. The modules incorporate computational techniques in the context of scientific applications. They include exercises to provide practice in applying these techniques and assessments for students to demonstrate mastery. In a flipped approach, the modules are made available online to be read before class, and in class students work together to complete the exercises. Questions can be immediately addressed and peer learning and collaboration takes place naturally. Following the completion of the course, these modules will be embedded in core physics courses throughout the major sequence at introductory, intermediate and advanced levels. In this way students will progressively learn and practice essential computational skills without the Department having to staff a standalone course. In this presentation we will share what has worked in using self-study learning modules with embedded exercises and assessment; our experience of using web-based computational notebooks on a dedicated server; what we’ve tried and learned from attempting to create a culturally inclusive learning environment, for example our use of hybrid journals, student generated scientist profiles, and student consultants; and we will report on the experiences of students in the course. This effort is being funded by a grant from the Association of American Colleges & Universities TIDES project (Teaching to Increase Diversity and Equity in STEM).

http://repository.brynmawr.edu/blended_learning/2015/2015/17