Title

Flipping Introduction to Psychology

Streaming Media

Submission Type

Event

Abstract

What is the impact of flipping an Introduction to Psychology class on student outcomes? Do students use the resources? Like the structure? Does flipping impact on student perception of psychology as a science? Previous research suggests that flipping a course leaves more time for greater in-depth consideration of topics during class (Garrison & Kanuka, 2004). For psychology, that would mean more activities devoted to demonstrations, which could result in greater understanding of psychology as a science. This project examines several aspects of flipping an Introduction to Psychology course, by comparing a course section that was "flipped" by providing students with audio recordings of lecture segments and PowerPoint slides, and an unflipped control. Dr. Heberle will discuss comparative findings from several measures of potential impact, including student attitudinal surveys, final grades, attendance and usage reports, scores on the Perception of Psychology as Science instrument (PPAS, Friedrich, 1996), and share conclusions about what and how much should be flipped.

Session

Session 7: Blending in Psychology

Location

Thomas 110

Start Date

5-22-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

5-22-2014 10:50 AM

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May 22nd, 10:00 AM May 22nd, 10:50 AM

Flipping Introduction to Psychology

Thomas 110

What is the impact of flipping an Introduction to Psychology class on student outcomes? Do students use the resources? Like the structure? Does flipping impact on student perception of psychology as a science? Previous research suggests that flipping a course leaves more time for greater in-depth consideration of topics during class (Garrison & Kanuka, 2004). For psychology, that would mean more activities devoted to demonstrations, which could result in greater understanding of psychology as a science. This project examines several aspects of flipping an Introduction to Psychology course, by comparing a course section that was "flipped" by providing students with audio recordings of lecture segments and PowerPoint slides, and an unflipped control. Dr. Heberle will discuss comparative findings from several measures of potential impact, including student attitudinal surveys, final grades, attendance and usage reports, scores on the Perception of Psychology as Science instrument (PPAS, Friedrich, 1996), and share conclusions about what and how much should be flipped.